Translate this Page




ONLINE
2



 

 

 

 



Total de visitas: 364346
American and British ENGLISH

What’s the difference between British English vs American English?

British and American English have significantly different vocabulary and usage. There are different words for the same concept, or the same word has different meanings. Below are some of the more common words used differently.

 

 

History

The British actually introduced the language to the Americas when they reached these lands by sea between the 16th and 17th centuries. At that time, spelling had not yet been standardised. It took the writing of the first dictionaries to set in stone how these words appeared. In the UK, the dictionary was compiled by London-based scholars. Meanwhile, in the United States, the lexicographer was a man named Noah Webster. Allegedly, he changed how the words were spelled to make the American version different from the British as a way of showing cultural independence from its mother country.

In terms of speech, the differences between American and British English actually took place after the first settlers arrived in America. These groups of people spoke using what was called rhotic speech, where the ‘r’ sounds of words are pronounced. Meanwhile, the higher classes in the UK wanted to distinguish the way they spoke from the common masses by softening their pronunciation of the ‘r’ sounds. Since the elite even back then were considered the standard for being fashionable, other people began to copy their speech, until it eventually became the common way of speaking in the south of England. 

Spelling differences

British and American English have some spelling differences. The common ones are presented in the table below.

British English

American English

-oe-/-ae- (e.g. anaemia, diarrhoea, encyclopaedia)

-e- (e.g. anemia, diarrhea, encyclopedia)

-t (e.g. burnt, dreamt, leapt)

-ed (e.g. burned, dreamed, leaped)

-ence (e.g. defence, offence, licence)

-ense (defense, offense, license)

-ell- (e.g. cancelled, jeweller, marvellous)

-el- (e.g. canceled, jeweler, marvelous)

-ise (e.g. appetiser, familiarise, organise)

-ize (e.g. appetizer, familiarize, organize)

-l- (e.g. enrol, fulfil, skilful)

-ll- (e.g. enroll, fulfill, skillfull)

-ogue (e.g. analogue, monologue, catalogue)

-og (e.g. analog, monolog, catalog)

*Note that American English also recognizes words spelled with –ogue

-ou (e.g. colour, behaviour, mould)

-o (e.g. color, behavior, mold)

-re (e.g. metre, fibre, centre)

-er (e.g. meter, fiber, center)

-y- (e.g. tyre)

-i- (e.g. tire)

 

Vocabulary differences

The Americans and the British also have some words that differ from each other. The table below lists some of the everyday objects that have different names, depending on what form of English you are using.

British English

American English

trousers

pants

flat

apartment

bonnet (the front of the car)

hood

boot (the back of the car)

trunk

lorry

truck

university

college

holiday

vacation

jumper

sweater

crisps

chips

chips

French fries

trainers

sneakers

fizzy drink

soda

postbox

mailbox

biscuit

cookie

chemist

drugstore

shop

store

football

soccer

 

Grammar differences

Aside from spelling and vocabulary, there are certain grammar differences between British and American English. For instance, in American English, collective nouns are considered singular (e.g. The band is playing). In contrast, collective nouns can be either singular or plural in British English, although the plural form is most often used (e.g. The band are playing).

The British are also more likely to use formal speech, such as ‘shall’, whereas Americans favour the more informal ‘will’ or ‘should’.   

Americans, however, continue to use ‘gotten’ as the past participle of ‘get’, which the British have long since dropped in favour of ‘got’.

‘Needn’t’, which is commonly used in British English, is rarely, if at all used in American English. In its place is ‘don’t need to’.

In British English, ‘at’ is the preposition in relation to time and place. However, in American English, ‘on’ is used instead of the former and ‘in’ for the latter.

 

British English vs American English

Learn the difference between American English vs British English.

British vs American English

1. Post ………… Mail

2. Film ………… Movie

3. Rubbish ………… Garbage

4. Football ………… Soccer

5. Chips ………… Fries

6. Rubber ………… Eraser

7. Zip ………… Zipper

8. Biscuit ………… Cookie

9. Taxi ………… Cab

10. Sweets ………… Candy

11. Maize ………… Corn

12. Trainers ………… Sneakers

13. Lorry ………… Truck

14. Underground ………… Subway

15. Petrol ………… Gasoline

Difference between British English vs American English

British English vs American English

16. Cooker ………… Stove

17. Tap ………… Faucet

18. Flat ………… Apartment

19. Wardrobe ………… Closet

20. Crisps ………… Chips

21. Nappy ………… Diaper

22. Dummy ………… Pacifier

23. Trousers ………… Pants

24. Torch ………… Flashlight

25. Handbag ………… Purse

26. Pyjamas ………… Pajamas

27. Waistcoat ………… Vest

28. Bill ………… Check

29. Car park ………… Parking lot

30. Tin ………… Can

British vs American English

difference between British English vs American English

31. Jelly ………… Jello

32. Tyre ………… Tire

33. Sofa ………… Couch

34. Mobile phone ………… Cell phone

35. Full-stop ………… Period (punctuation marks)

36. Toilet ………… Restroom

37. Garden ………… Yard

38. Chemist ………… Pharmacist

39. Engineer ………… Plumber

40. Jumper ………… Sweater

41. Aubergine ………… Eggplant

42. Aeroplane ………… Airplane

43. Timetable ………… Schedule

44. Trolley ………… Cart

45. Coolbox ………… Cooler

46. Queue ………… Line

47. Lawyer ………… Solicitor

48. Rasher ………… Bacon

49. Omelette ………… Omelet

50. Curtains ………… Drapes

1. Post ………… Mail

2. Film ………… Movie

3. Rubbish ………… Garbage

4. Football ………… Soccer

5. Chips ………… Fries

6. Rubber ………… Eraser

7. Zip ………… Zipper

8. Biscuit ………… Cookie

9. Taxi ………… Cab

10. Sweets ………… Candy

11. Maize ………… Corn

12. Trainers ………… Sneakers

13. Lorry ………… Truck

14. Underground ………… Subway

15. Petrol ………… Gasoline

Difference between British English vs American English

British English vs American English

16. Cooker ………… Stove

17. Tap ………… Faucet

18. Flat ………… Apartment

19. Wardrobe ………… Closet

20. Crisps ………… Chips

21. Nappy ………… Diaper

22. Dummy ………… Pacifier

23. Trousers ………… Pants

24. Torch ………… Flashlight

25. Handbag ………… Purse

26. Pyjamas ………… Pajamas

27. Waistcoat ………… Vest

28. Bill ………… Check

29. Car park ………… Parking lot

30. Tin ………… Can

British vs American English

difference between British English vs American English

31. Jelly ………… Jello

32. Tyre ………… Tire

33. Sofa ………… Couch

34. Mobile phone ………… Cell phone

35. Full-stop ………… Period (punctuation marks)

36. Toilet ………… Restroom

37. Garden ………… Yard

38. Chemist ………… Pharmacist

39. Engineer ………… Plumber

40. Jumper ………… Sweater

41. Aubergine ………… Eggplant

42. Aeroplane ………… Airplane

43. Timetable ………… Schedule

44. Trolley ………… Cart

45. Coolbox ………… Cooler

46. Queue ………… Line

47. Lawyer ………… Solicitor

48. Rasher ………… Bacon

49. Omelette ………… Omelet

50. Curtains ………… Drapes

Difference between British vs American English | Infographic

Difference between American English vs British English

british english vs american english